WIKI
Avocado

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Avocado

• Technically a fruit, the avocado is pretty special. They are grown in warmer climates between 45° North and 60° South latitude. Avocados mature on trees, but can only ripen once picked. All avocados are still picked by hand.

How-to Videos

Seasonality

Year-Round

Selection & Storage

• Check for ripeness by peeling back the stem cap on top. If it doesn’t budge, it’s not ripe yet. If green, it’s great for snacking, and if it’s brown, it’s already mushy and overripe.

• If you buy hard or green avocados they will take 4-5 days to ripen. Keep ‘em on the counter at room temperature.

• If you are in a rush, put them in a paper bag with a banana for the fastest ripening.

• Once ripe, avocados will last for up to 10 days if you store them in your refrigerator's vegetable drawer.

• Did you only use half? Preserve the other half by keeping the seed inside and sticking in the fridge.

Cooking Tips

Avocado flesh will start to brown as soon as it’s exposed to oxygen, so don’t cut into your avocados until just before serving.
Squeezing citrus juice over avocado will help prevent it from turning brown.
Halve and pit avocados before grilling them for about 3 minutes until they have nice char marks. This will add an additional smokiness to your guac or sliced avocado for salads/whatever you want.
Cut an avocado in half and crack an egg into the hole. Bake and top with hot sauce for an easy and delicious breakfast!

Clever Uses

• Swap out butter for avocado in your next batch of brownies- they will be just as rich and chock full of healthy fats.

• Does your hair need a boost? Before your next shower, mash half an avocado and then add two eggs whites. Work the mixture into your hair and leave on for 15 min to moisturize. Wash as usual.

Health Benefits

Avocados pack a healthy punch containing nearly 20 essential nutrients such as fiber, potassium, Vitamin E, Vitamin B and folic acid. On top of that, avocados help the body absorb more fat-soluble nutrients such as carotenes.

Food Science

• Avocados have an enzyme (def: molecules that help reactions happen) that starts a process combining the air’s oxygen with the avocado’s polyphenols, which turns them into molecules called melanins, which are dark in color = brown spots!

• But, this enzyme can’t function if the environment is too hot or too acidic/basic, and the cold slows it down. That’s why we squeeze lemon juice on avocado flesh, and keep leftovers in the fridge.

• Dipping an avocado in boiling water would work too, but it would be gross. Save that for the similarly-browning apple.

Corrections or improvements? Email us at

content@sidechef.com

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